Girl Scouts offers awards as a way for girls and volunteers to continue their Girl Scout journey. The Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards are the highest honors a Girl Scout may receive. The Product Programs department also offers the Stellar Seller Award for Girl Scouts who exceed the set fall product and cookie goals. Volunteers may also be nominated for an Adult Award, which honors their continued service to the organization.


Girl Scout Juniors should have their Bronze Award final project paperwork to GSMIDTN no later than September 30 of the year they complete 5th grade. Girl Scout Cadettes should have their Silver Award final project paperwork to GSMIDTN no later than September 30 of the year they complete 8th grade. Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors should have their Gold Award final project paperwork to GSMIDTN no later than September 30 of the year they complete 12th grade.

Submission of final paperwork to GSMIDTN qualifies Girl Scouts to be honored in the following year’s Girl Scout Honors Day ceremony. If any Girl Scout would like to complete a project early and wish to be recognized at Girl Scout Honors Day, the deadline is February 1.

DID YOU KNOW? To earn their Highest Awards, girls should be creating their own Take Action Projects; the implementation of preexisting programs is not allowed unless a new and unique component is added. The portion that is new and unique must also be incorporated into the sustainability aspect of the project. (This means that girls should avoid participating in projects such as Project Linus, Little Libraries, and Buddy Benches.) Contact Highest Awards with any questions.

Download GSUSA and GSMIDTN Highest Awards Standards and Guidelines At-a-Glance

 

  • Bronze Award

    The Girl Scout Bronze Award is the highest honor a Girl Scout Junior can achieve. Earning the Girl Scout Bronze Award involves the time to complete a journey, as well as a suggested minimum of 20 hours building her team, exploring her community, choosing her project and planning, putting in motion, and spreading the word about her project.

    Girl Scout Juniors should have their Bronze Award final project paperwork to GSMIDTN no later than September 30 of the year they complete 5th grade. Submission of final paperwork to GSMIDTN qualifies Girl Scouts to be honored in the following year’s Girl Scout Honors Day ceremony. If any Girl Scout would like to complete a project early and wish to be recognized at Girl Scout Honors Day, the deadline is February 1.

    Bronze Award Process

    Bronze Award Guidelines
    Bronze Award Standards
    Bronze Award Final Report

    Supplementary Forms and Materials

    Bronze Award Adult Volunteer Guide – English & Spanish

  • Silver Award

    The Silver Award is the highest award a Girl Scout Cadette can earn. The Silver Award can be earned individually or in groups of four or less (per GSUSA). For detailed information about the Silver Award, please refer to the Cadette Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting.

    Girl Scout Cadettes should have their Silver Award final project paperwork to GSMIDTN no later than September 30 of the year they complete 8th grade. Submission of final paperwork to GSMIDTN qualifies Girl Scouts to be honored in the following year’s Girl Scout Honors Day ceremony. If any Girl Scout would like to complete a project early and wish to be recognized at Girl Scout Honors Day, the deadline is February 1.

    Silver Award Process

    Silver Award Guidelines
    Silver Award Proposal
    Silver Award Final Report

    Supplementary Forms and Materials

    Silver Award Adult Volunteer Guide – English & Spanish

  • Gold Award

    The Gold Award is the highest award a Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador can earn. Completion of a Gold Award project means a Girl Scout has left her mark on her community and her world. Gold Award Girl Scouts also receive more lifetime benefits than their peers. The Gold Award must be earned individually. For detailed information about the Gold Award, please refer to the Senior or Ambassador Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting.

    Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors should have their Gold Award final project paperwork to GSMIDTN no later than September 30 of the year they complete 12th grade. Submission of final paperwork to GSMIDTN qualifies Girl Scouts to be honored in the following year’s Girl Scout Honors Day ceremony. If any Girl Scout would like to complete a project early and wish to be recognized at Girl Scout Honors Day, the deadline is February 1.

    GoGold Online Portal

    GoGold Online is a secure, online portal that you can use to submit your Gold Award proposal and final report. GoGold takes you through each of the Gold Award steps while offering new ways to examine the issue you want to work on and its root causes, plan your project, set goals, map a timeline, and add your team members. Plus, GoGold is the exclusive way your council can nominate a Gold Award Girl Scout for consideration to be selected for the GSUSA Gold Award Scholarship.

    GoGold Frequently Asked Questions

    Gold Award Process

    Gold Award Guidelines
    Gold Award Proposal
    Gold Award Final Report

    Access GoGold Portal from GSUSA

    View Scholarships from GSUSA

    Supplementary Forms and Materials

    Gold Award Adult Volunteer Guide
    Gold Award Guide for Parents/Caregivers
    Gold Award Guide for Project Advisors
    Gold Award Guide for Troop Leaders

  • Community Service Bar

    The Community Service Bar can be earned by Cadette, Senior, and Ambassador Girl Scouts by making a difference in the community and practicing the values of the Girl Scout Law. It is also a way for girls to get involved with a cause they care about.

    Girl Scouts have the option to complete their Cadette, Senior, or Ambassador Community Service Bar as well as the Service to Girl Scouting Bar, but they must be different projects.  To complete the Service to Girl Scouting Bar, Girl Scouts must volunteer at least 20 hours within Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee.

    Your application must be approved before you can start your Community Service Bar project. Contact Highest Awards with any questions.

    Community Service Bar Process

    Community Service Bar Application
    Community Service Bar Final Report

  • Stellar Seller Award

    The Stellar Seller Award is awarded to Girl Scouts who sell $1,000 or more in the Fall Product Program (which includes magazines, nuts, and candy) or to Girl Scouts who sell 1,000 or more packages of Girl Scout Cookies.

  • Faith Based Awards

    While we are a secular organization, Girl Scouts has encouraged girls to take spiritual journeys via their individual faith recognitions since the movement began in 1912.

    My Promise, My Faith Pin

    Girls of all grade levels can now earn the My Promise, My Faith pin developed by Girl Scouts of the USA. This pin, which girls can earn once a year, allows all girls to further strengthen the connection between their faith and Girl Scouts. Pin requirements for all levels are included in Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting or in this document.

    Religious Recognitions

    Girl Scouts recognizes and respects the religious diversity that exists within our communities. Girls in the same troop often represent a wide variety of faiths. Religious recognitions are associated with specific faith groups and are awarded after completion of a program developed by that community.

    Each religious organization/committee develops and administers its own program. The To Serve God religious recognitions brochure shows the religious recognitions that have been created by various faith groups.

  • Adult Award

    Girl Scouts recognizes the continued support of adult volunteers by offering Adult Awards. For a complete list of Adult Awards, refer to the Adult Awards Booklet.

    Supplementary Forms and Materials

    Adult Awards Booklet
    Trained Volunteer Pin Application
    Leaves for Trained Volunteer Pin Application
    Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee President’s Award Application
    Council Adult Recognition Award Recipient Form
    Service Unit Authorization Form for GSUSA and Council Awards

  • President's Award

    The President’s Award recognizes the efforts of a service delivery team or committee whose exemplary service in support of delivering the Girl Scout Leadership Experience surpassed team goals and resulted in significant, measurable impact toward reaching the council’s overall goals.

  • Agenia Clark Scholarship for Excellence in Leadership

    In 2015, the Sue Peters Foundation for Girls of Character, Courage, and Confidence created a scholarship for girls who have demonstrated outstanding leadership by earning the highest award available to girls – the Girl Scout Gold Award. The scholarship can be applied to tuition, fees, books, supplies, and equipment required for course load at accredited, nonprofit two or four-year college or university in the United States. Please note, the scholarship must be used the summer or fall following the girl’s graduation from high school.

    Gold Award Girl Scouts can apply for this scholarship during their senior year in high school. Recipients are awarded annually at the highest award ceremony. Generally, applications for the Agenia Clark Gold Award Scholarship for Excellence in Leadership open in October and close in March. Details for applying will be sent to all girls in grade twelve each fall. Contact Highest Awards with any questions.

    Award: Amount Varies
    Application Open: October 2021
    Application Deadline:
    March 2022
    Requirements:

    • Girl Scout Gold Award recipient whose troop, at the time of the award, was under the jurisdiction of GSMIDTN
    • High school senior attending an accredited, post-secondary two or four-year college or university in the U.S. immediately following high school graduation
    • Minimum GPA of 2.5

 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Why are Journeys prerequisites to earn the Awards?
    The skills girls gain while working on the Journeys will help them develop, plan, and implement their award Take Action Project.
  • How do girls know when a journey is completed?
    A Journey is completed when a girl has earned the Journey awards, which include creating and carrying out a Take Action project.
  • What makes the awards' guidelines different from the Journeys?
    Journeys give girls themes on which to base their Journey Take Action Project. The Girl Scout Highest Award Take Action Projects have no pre-designed theme. Girls select their own theme, design, and execute their Take Action Project.
  • Service vs. Action: What’s the Difference?
    Girl Scouts often do both community service and Take Action or Highest Awards Projects. Both kinds of projects help communities in different ways. So what’s the difference?

    Community service makes the world better for some people right now. For example, collecting cans of food for the local food pantry feeds people right now. Gathering toys for a homeless family shelter makes kids happy right now. Providing clothing and toiletries to people who have suffered a disaster helps them get through a traumatic event right now. These acts of kindness are important ways to help some people—right now.

    Take Action Projects, along with Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards, address the root cause of an issue and come up with sustainable, longer-lasting solutions. These projects strive to make the world a better place for more people for a much longer time. Sometimes, service and action just naturally blend together into one sustainable effort. As a Girl Scout, you use both service and action to live out the Girl Scout Law and “make the world a better place!”

  • What are the suggested hours for earning each of the awards?
    The time it takes to earn the awards will depend on the nature of the project, the size of the team, and the support of the community. Quality projects should be emphasized over quantity of hours. After the Journey requirement is fulfilled, the following is a suggested minimum number of hours:

    • Girl Scout Bronze Award: suggested minimum 20 hours
    • Girl Scout Silver Award: suggested minimum 50 hours
    • Girl Scout Gold Award: suggested minimum 80 hours
  • Can a troop work on an Award together?
    Each award level brings a new progression of leadership development and each award level has different group guidelines. At the Bronze level, girls are encouraged to work together in a team setting.
 When girls work on their Silver Award, they have the option to work individually or in a group of four or less. The Gold Award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting, and girls must earn the Gold Award as an individual.

  • May girls begin work after they bridge?
    Yes, girls can begin to earn the awards over the summer prior to their bridging ceremony.
  • Can Take Action Projects for awards focus on Girl Scouting?
    Final Take Action Projects for the Girl Scout Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards may focus on service in support of the Girl Scout movement. Girls should fully explore their communities to decide what they would like to do to make the world a better place, and then they decide how they’ll tackle it and for whom.
  • Who are the adult guidelines for – council staff, parents, or volunteers?
    The guidelines were designed for volunteers working directly with girls on their awards, but any adult is welcome to use them.
  • Are there requirements for girls with disabilities?
    No. The Girl Scout Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards are done to the best of a girl’s ability. There is no need to have special requirements for girls with disabilities.
  • Can a troop or group do their Gold Award together?
    The Gold Award is an individual girl’s journey. The Gold Award process requires a girl to take control of her leadership development and grow in new ways that a group setting cannot provide. This is a commitment she makes and completes as an individual.
  • Can my girls participate in projects such as “Project Linus,” “Little Libraries,” “Buddy Benches,” etc.?
    As the implementation of preexisting programs is not allowed unless a new and unique component is added, girls should be creating their own Take Action Projects to work towards their highest awards. The portion that is new and unique must also be incorporated into the sustainability aspect of the project. (This means that girls should avoid participating in projects such as Project Linus, Little Libraries, and Buddy Benches.)
  • What does it mean to have a sustainable project?
    A sustainable project is one that lasts after the girl’s involvement ends. A focus on education and raising awareness is one way to make sure a project is carried on. Workshops and hands-on learning sessions can inspire others to keep the project going. Another way to create a sustainable project is by collaborating with community groups, civic associations, non-profit agencies, local government, and/or religious organizations to ensure the project lasts beyond the girl’s involvement.
  • Is sustainability differentiated at each grade level?
    There is progression. Girl Scout Juniors work on their Bronze Award and reflect on how the project could be kept going, Girl Scout Cadettes plan for sustainability, and Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors work to ensure the sustainability of their project in order to meet the Gold Award standards of excellence.
  • How does a girl measure project impact?
    Girls identify their project goals for their community, target audience, and themselves by developing success indicators using a matrix provided in the guidelines.
  • How can we make sure that Girl Scout Awards represent quality projects?
    Make sure to understand the difference between a one-time community service opportunity or event and a Girl Scout Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Take Action Project. It’s the responsibility of the troop/group volunteer, council staff member, or Gold Award committee to ensure that girls meet the quality requirements of the award.
  • Who can earn the Girl Scout Gold Award?
    A girl must be a registered Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador to apply for and complete her Gold Award.
  • Can Juliettes earn the Girl Scout Gold Award?
    Any girl who meets the grade-level and membership requirements can work on her Girl Scout Gold Award.
  • Does a Senior/Ambassador need to do the two Journeys in any particular order?
    No. She can complete either two Girl Scout Senior Journeys, two Girl Scout Ambassador Journeys, or one of each.
  • Why can’t a parent be a Girl Scout Gold Award Project Advisor?
    Girls are encouraged to connect with their community when earning the Girl Scout Gold Award. The Project Advisor should be a subject matter expert that can offer valuable insight into the project.
  • At what point should a Girl Scout Gold Award project advisor be identified?
    The Project Advisor should be identified in the planning phase before the Girl Scout Gold Award Project Proposal is turned in to the council. The Project Advisor expands the network of adults and provides expertise for a girl’s project. If a girl has an idea before she starts any work on her Girl Scout Gold Award, she might want to identify her Project Advisor from the very beginning.
  • Can a girl earn the Gold Award even if she hasn’t been in Girl Scouts very long?
    Yes! She just needs to be a registered Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador to begin her Gold Award project.
  • Can a girl complete her project when she is in college?
    A girl has until the end of the Girl Scout membership year (September 30) of the year she graduates from high school. Meaning, if she graduates in May 2020, she has until September 30, 2020 to complete her Gold Award project.
  • What if a girl’s project is not completed by the council ceremony time?
    She can be honored in a separate ceremony or come back for the council-wide ceremony the next year. The council has a set time for honoring Girl Scout Gold Awardees, and this should be part of the girl’s planning for her Girl Scout Gold Award. Girls and their Project Advisors are encouraged to work within the council timeline; however, the ceremony time should not dictate whether or not a girl is able to earn her Girl Scout Gold Award.